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Sunday, December 3, 2017
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The Chronicle


From the Friendliest Newspaper in The Villages                                                                                                                                                                                       
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(Decorations, A New Cody's, Open Carry, Disney)

november 26, 2017 BY staff report november 24, 2017 BY staff report
Sumter County Sheriff's Office Collecting Christmas Decorations For Families in Need

Newest Cody’s Restaurant in The Villages Targeting For a Holiday Opening


 



 


Got an attic full of old Christmas decorations that you just can't possibly use this Christmas.  Well looky, looky here>>>>>

The Sumter County Sheriff’s Office will be collecting used and new artificial Christmas trees and decorations that will be passed on to different areas of the county for families in need.

The sheriff’s office will start the collection Monday, Nov. 27 and it will continue through Dec. 18 at the Villages Sumter County Sheriff’s Annex located at 8035 E. CR 466

Items can be dropped off between 8 a.m. and 5 p.m.

If you don't feel like taking them all the way down to the Sheriff's Office, bring them to the Editor's House (1312 Witherspoon) anytime before December 15th.  We'll have a special bin on our front porch for you to drop them into (easily).  Please make sure that strings of lights are all working before you donate them. 

And Thanks.  We'll make a special trip on December 16th to the sheriff's office to off-load them all, new or used.

The newest Cody’s Original Roadhouse is on track to open right around Christmas in The Villages.

The type of decor that is synonymous with the popular restaurant chain is being added at the new restaurant located at Mulberry Grove Plaza on County Road 42.

A new Cody’s Original Roadhouse is targeting a Christmas opening at Mulberry Grove Plaza in The Villages.  This is the third Cody’s here in Florida’s Friendliest Hometown.

The first Cody’s in The Villages opened at Lake Sumter Landing. The popularity of that venture prompted another Cody’s which opened in 2014 at Brownwood.

Last year, Cody’s upgraded its patio at the Lake Sumter Landing location.

november 27, 2017 BY jim saunders november 17, 2017 BY gabrielle russon - contact reporter

U.S. Supreme Court Rejects Challenge to Florida's Ban on Open-Carry


Disney has a loyal following in an unexpected place - The Villages

TALLAHASSEE — The U.S. Supreme Court on Monday refused to take up a challenge to a Florida law that bars people from openly carrying firearms in public, ending a case that started nearly six years ago when a man was arrested in St. Lucie County.

The U.S. Supreme Court, as is common, did not explain its reasons for declining to hear the case. But the move effectively let stand a Florida Supreme Court ruling in March that said the open-carry ban did not violate the constitutional right to bear arms.

The plaintiff in the case, Dale Norman, was arrested in February 2012 as he openly carried a gun in a holster. Norman, who had a concealed-weapons license, was found guilty of a second-degree misdemeanor, with a judge imposing a $300 fine and court costs, according to court documents.

Backed by the Second Amendment group Florida Carry, Norman challenged the constitutionality of the state’s longstanding ban on openly carrying weapons. But the state’s 4th District Court of Appeal and the Florida Supreme Court ruled against Norman, leading him to go to the U.S. Supreme Court.

In a petition filed with the U.S. Supreme Court, Norman’s attorneys pointed to major rulings in Second Amendment cases from Chicago and Washington, D.C., and argued that the right to openly bear arms exists outside homes.

“The Second Amendment provides in part that ‘the right of the people to keep and bear arms, shall not be infringed.’ This guarantees not only the right to `keep’ arms, such as in one’s house, but also to `bear arms,′ which simply means to carry arms without reference to a specific place. When the Framers intended that a provision of the Bill of Rights related to a house, they said so,” said the petition, filed in July and posted on the Florida Carry website.

But attorneys for the state wrote in a brief that the ban does not violate Second Amendment rights, as people can carry concealed weapons if they have licenses.

“This (U.S. Supreme) Court has never held that the Second Amendment protects a right to openly carry firearms in public, and the reasoning set forth in pertinent caselaw supports the proposition that states fully accommodate the right to bear arms when they make available to responsible, law-abiding citizens some meaningful form of public carry,” the state’s brief said. “That is precisely what Florida has done here. Thus, Florida’s law is valid under any arguably applicable analytical framework.”

State lawmakers have proposed measures that would allow people with concealed-weapons licenses to openly carry firearms, but the proposals have not passed. Senate Judiciary Chairman Greg Steube, a Sarasota Republican and prominent gun-rights supporter, said this month he did not plan to file such a measure for the 2018 legislative session, which starts in January.




   




Out to have some fun at Disney World, the senior citizens fastened their seat belts for the 13-story plummet on the Tower of Terror.

“We’re all going to die sometime,” joked Dick Winters, 61, before the shrieking laughter began.

These are the thrill seekers from The Villages, the 55-and-up community northwest of Leesburg that has built up a devoted Disney following over the years. Maybe it has something to do with being called the Disney World for retirees.

“I think they’re stereotyping us sitting in The Villages in our rocking chairs, waiting to croak,” said Debbie Winters, who started a fan club called Mickey’s Fanatics in 2011. “Disney means a lot to everybody. There is no age limit.”

Winters’ club grew to 850 members with a 200-person-long waiting list because there was not enough space in the clubhouse. It has become so popular a second group, the Goofy Villagers, formed last year and has 366 members with a wait list of nearly 100.

The clubs regularly organize trips to the theme parks, host elaborate costume parties and invite speakers with ties to Disney to meetings.

On a recent November afternoon, two charter buses filled with 80 people wearing mouse ears and Mickey T-shirts pulled up at Hollywood Studios.They ranged from their mid-50s up into their 70s and 80s while the oldest, a woman celebrating her 91st birthday, wore a princess tiara and was in a wheelchair.

A small group of roller coaster fans broke off for the Tower of Terror.

Marie Gipple, 67, reluctantly joined them, nervously wringing her hands in line. Nancy Powierza, a 70-year-old grandmother of three, reminded her to keep her hands up in the air.

A Disney employee ushered them into the elevator shaft.

“Here we go!” someone shouted before a jolt and the fall.

Linda Araujo’s Santa hat fell off although her reading glasses strapped to her shirt stayed fastened. Gipple gripped her seat with both hands. She wasn’t smiling.

Everything was over in a matter of seconds, and their bodies were still again. They broke into a round of applause.

Afterward, the Mickey Fanatics members giddily admired their photographs snapped during the ride.

“I was frightened,” Gipple said, but she was smiling again. “I held on, I’m telling you, with both sides.”

Araujo, 68, was ready for more. Later that afternoon, Araujo, also a Universal Studios Orlando season pass holder, locked down a Fast Pass for Rock 'n' Roller Coaster Starring Aerosmith.

“It’s like being a kid,” Araujo said. “We just have a grand ole time.”

The Villages residents laughed about being free of strollers and children throwing tantrums. They moved at their own pace, stopping to eat at a restaurant or admire the details of this fantasy world.

“We’ve all been to the park many, many, many times. We don’t have to rush for anything,” said Rich Leopold, 63, who kicked off a meeting this summer at his Goofy Villagers group with the “Pledge of Allegiance” and then “Zip-a-Dee-Doo-Dah.”

For some, they were reminded of their youth or family vacations when they were raising their children.

“It’s more about reliving the memories,” Winters said. “Watching families. Watching children. Watching people experience Disney for the first time.”

Such groups “show us how the young and young at heart continue to find such joy visiting our theme parks,” Disney spokeswoman Andrea Finger said in a statement, declining to say how many parkgoers ages 55 or over visit each year.

Winters, 62, realized her club’s impact when an 83-year-old who died mentioned Mickey’s Fanatics in her obituary.

Jeff and Anni Albert, who went on their first date to Disneyland, shared their first kiss on the Peter Pan’s Flight in 1959. They celebrated their 50th wedding anniversary at Disney World.

Now in their mid-70s, they threw their hands in the air and screamed on roller coasters with the Goofy Villagers.

“As long as we’re able to do things,” said Jeff Albert. “Why not?”



December 3, 2017

"Bibbidi-Bobbidi-Boo" (also called "The Magic Song") is a novelty song, written in 1949 by Al Hoffman, Mack David, and Jerry Livingston. It was introduced in the 1950 film Cinderella, performed by actress Verna Felton.

Ilene Woods and The Woodsmen with Harold Mooney and His Orchestra recorded it in Hollywood on October 26, 1949. It was released by RCA Victor Records as catalog number 31-00138B and by EMI on the His Master's Voice label as catalog numbers B 9970, SG 2371, HM 3755 and JM 2678.



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