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Sunday, November 12, 2017 

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President Trump has given the go ahead to release many JFK assassination records
What a concept!!  At last, many of us thought that we were going to at last learn the truth about that November day in 1963.  Then came the first day of releases and what did we learn?

Almost nothing.  Did Oswald act alone.  Maybe?   Probably?  Sort of?  Nothing really says.  Some 5,000,000 + documents were de-classified.  Could the average human honestly read every page of every document.  Nah!

On July 24, 2017, 3,810 documents were released.  What did we learn?

Highlights of this release include 17 audio files of interviews of Yuri Nosenko, a KGB officer who defected to the United States in January 1964. Nosenko claimed to have been the officer in charge of the KGB file on Lee Harvey Oswald during Oswald’s time in the Soviet Union. The interviews were conducted in January, February, and July of 1964.

This set of 3,810 documents is the first to be processed for release, and includes FBI and CIA records—441 documents previously withheld in full and 3,369 documents previously released with portions redacted. In some cases, only the previously redacted pages of documents will be released. The previously released portions of the file can be requested and viewed in person at the National Archives at College Park (these records are not online).

On October 26, 2017, 2,891 additional documents were released.  What did we learn?

The National Archives previously released 3,810 related records on July 24, 2017, including 441 records previously withheld in their entirety and 3,369 records previously withheld in part. More information about this release is available online.

In addition, the National Archives is also releasing to the public the unclassified electronic records of the Assassination Records Review Board (ARRB), including 52,387 emails and 16,627 files from the ARRB drives.

On November 3, 2017, another 676 documents were released.  What did we learn?

Last week, President Donald J. Trump ordered all remaining records governed by section 5 of the JFK Act be released to the public.  The President also directed agencies to complete another review of their proposed redactions and only redact information in the rarest of circumstances.  The release by the National Archives today represents the first in a series of rolling releases pursuant to the President’s memorandum based on prior reviews done by agencies.  The records included in this public release have not been reviewed by NARA.

The National Archives anticipates several additional public releases making all remaining records governed by section 5 available to the public as expeditiously as possible in accordance with the President’s order.  Each of these approximately 29,000 records, along with each of the records released today, remain subject to further review under that process.

The majority of the public release today consists of 553 Central Intelligence Agency (CIA) records that were previously denied in their entirety.  Also included in the release are records from components of the Departments of Justice (18) and Defense (48), the House Select Committee on Assassinations (56), and the National Archives (1).  Released records are available for download.

All together, these three releases add up to more than 5,000,000 pages, all since July 24th.  Now after over 50 years have passed, who has time to read all 5,000,000 + pages?

The President John F. Kennedy Assassination Records Collection Reference System is an electronic index to many (but not all) documents from the JFK Assassination Records Collection in the National Archives. The JFK Act of 1992 required agencies that held assassination records to record information about these records on Record Identification Forms (RIFs) for input into a master database. A copy of the RIF is also attached to each document. All of the records described are open for viewing and reproduction, but ARE NOT AVAILABLE ON LINE.

Some documents in the database are still under review by certain agencies or have been postponed from disclosure. This information is noted in the RESTRICTIONS field or the CURRENT STATUS field of the RIF. Updates to the system are made as agencies complete their reviews and transfer newly opened records to NARA. The database was last updated on May 12, 2008, and currently contains 319,106 records.

Not all the material found in the Collection is indexed in the database. Material that was open for research on October 26, 1992, the day the JFK Act was signed, and was in the custody of the National Archives, did not have to be entered into the database. Most notably, most of the materials gathered by the President's Commission on the Assassination of President Kennedy (commonly called the Warren Commission) have not been separately indexed. Additionally, documents received from private donors outside of the Federal government are not described in the database. Finding Aids describe records not in the JFK Database.

So unless you've got a team of thousands of researchers, two or three lifetimes, and really, really trust the U.S. Government to release all the pertinent data, you're probably like most of us - Still in the dark.

November
12

Sunday
November
13

Monday
November
14

Tuesday
November
15
 
Wednesday
November
16

Thursday
November
17

Friday
November
18

Saturday

National
Pizza with
the Works
(Except
Anchovies)
Day

World
Kindness
Day

National
Pickle
Day
National
Bundt
(Pan)
Day
** National
Indiana
Day **
National
Baklava
Day
** National
Princess
Day **

National
Chicken
Soup for
the Soul
Day


National
Indian
Pudding
Day


National
Spicy
Guacamole
Day


National
Philanthropy
Day


National
Fast
Food
Day


National
Take A
Hike
Day


National
Vichyssoise
Day





National
Clean Out
Your
Refrigerator
Day


National
Button
Day



National
Adoption
Day



National
Spicy
Hermit
Cookie
Day


Great
American
Smokeout
Day

Mickey
Mouse
Birthday

National
Raisin
Bran
Cereal
Day


America
Recycles
Day


National
Educational
Support
Professionals
Day

** Not necessarily declared a National Day but has been proclaimed a special day. **
 

So that's a quick look at the celebrations that are happening this week.  Now ponder them for a moment, then move on to the Chronicle and see what's going on in our own Bonita neighborhood.


November 12, 2017

"(The) Mickey Mouse (Club) March", is the opening theme for The Mickey Mouse Club television show, which aired in the United States from October 1955 to 1959, on the ABC television network. (The first two lines are: Who’s the leader of the Club that’s made for you and me? M-I-C-- K-E-Y-- M-O-U-S-E!) The song is reprised with the slower "it's time to say goodbye" verse, at the end of each episode. In the show's opening, the song is partially performed by the characters Dumbo and Jiminy Cricket. It also ended with Donald Duck attempting to hit a gong with the "Mickey Mouse Club" title on it, but would end with comic results, such as him getting hit by lightning, or the gong turning out to be a pie, or Donald just hitting a triangle instead.

The song was written by the Mickey Mouse Club host Jimmie Dodd and was published by Hal Leonard Corporation, July 1, 1955.odd, who was a guitarist and musician hired by Walt Disney as a songwriter, wrote other songs used over the course of the series, as well, such as the “theme day” songs sung on the show.

Permission is granted to freely print, unmodified, up to 200 copies of the most up to date version of this document from http://www.witherspoonpath.com, or to copy it in off-the-net electronic form. Permission for any usual classroom use is granted. On the net/WWW, however, you must link here rather than put up your own page.  If you had not seen a notice like this on the document, you would have to assume you did not have permission to copy it. This document is still protected by U.S. copyright laws even though it may not have a copyright notice. Please don't send mail asking me if you can link here -- you can do so, without asking or telling me. The only people I prefer not link here are those who mail me asking for permission to link here.  For those of you that prefer the technical logo;

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