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Sunday, February 18, 2018 

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President's Day (2018)
- What is it and When is it? -
What Does Snoops.com Have to Say.


 

CLAIM

The federal holiday observed in the United States on the third Monday of February is officially designated as "Presidents' Day."

RATING

   FALSE

ORIGIN

February was always an important month — not just because it included the eagerly-anticipated Valentine’s Day, but because even though it was the shortest month of the year, it encompassed two holidays for which public schools were closed: Lincoln’s Birthday (February 12) and Washington’s Birthday (February 22). Two school-free days for the kids, two days off for working parents, and terrific bargains on bedding, linen, and towels at department store white sales. What wasn’t to like about February?

Nowadays, though, many of us — whether we be employees or students — don’t get any weekdays off at all in February, or we’re offered a single holiday that falls on the third Monday in February and is neither Lincoln’s nor Washington’s Birthday but some hybrid known as “Presidents’ Day.” What happened to our traditional February holidays? And just what the heck are we commemorating on “Presidents’ Day”?

Some of us think we’re observing George Washington’s Birthday (perpetually moved to more convenient Monday dates since 1971), some of us think we’re celebrating the combined birthdays of George Washington and Abraham Lincoln (two formerly separate holidays smushed into one), and some of us think we’re honoring the memory of all U.S. presidents past and present. Which is it?

Throughout the 19th century, George Washington was the towering figure of U.S. history to the American public. In honor of the man who commanded the Continental Army and led the American colonies to victory in the Revolutionary War, served as first President of the United States of America, and earned the sobriquet “The Father of Our Country,” Washington’s Birthday, February 22, was celebrated with more patriotic fervor than any holiday save the Fourth of July. Accordingly, the observance of Washington’s Birthday was made official in 1885 when President Chester Alan Arthur signed a bill establishing it as a federal holiday. (Washington was actually born on February 11, 1732, under the Julian calendar in effect at the time he was born, but his birth date is reckoned as February 22 under the Gregorian calendar which was adopted in 1752.)

However, the seeds of confusion were sown in 1968 with the passage of a piece of legislation known as Uniform Holidays Bill, intended to create more three-day weekends for federal employees by moving the observance of three existing federal holidays (Washington’s Birthday, Memorial Day, and Veterans Day) from fixed calendar dates to designated Mondays, and by establishing Columbus Day, also to be observed on a Monday, as a new federal holiday. (Subsequent legislation enacted several years later eventually restored the observance of Veterans Day to November 11.) Under this act, from 1971 onwards the observance date of Washington’s Birthday would be relocated from February 22 to the third Monday in February. (Oddly enough, this change guaranteed that Washington’s Birthday would never again be celebrated on his “actual” birthday of February 22, as the third Monday in February cannot fall any later than February 21.)

So far, so good. The date of observance of Washington’s Birthday might have been tinkered with a bit, but the holiday was still undeniably “Washington’s Birthday.” So what happened to Lincoln’s Birthday? And whence came “Presidents’ Day”?

The concept of combining Washington’s and Lincoln’s birthdays into one holiday called “President’s Day” was floated as far back as the early 1950s, as the New York Times noted in 1968:

The first uniform Monday holiday plan was promulgated by NATO [the National Association of Travel Organizations] in the early 1950’s. It called for combining Washington’s and Lincoln’s Birthdays into a single President’s Day, to be celebrated the third Monday in February, and shifting Memorial Day to the fourth Monday in May, Independence Day to the first Monday in July and Veterans Day to the second Monday in November.

This initial effort met with sporadic success in a few states. But after several years of attempting to get the individual states to adopt uniform Monday holidays, it became apparent that a Federal bill was needed to serve as an example for state action.

Although early efforts to implement a Uniform Holidays Bill in 1968 also proposed moving the observance of Washington’s Birthday to the third Monday in February and renaming the holiday “President’s Day,” the passed version of the bill provided only for the former. The official designation of the federal holiday observed on the third Monday of February is, and always has been, Washington’s Birthday:

This holiday is designated as “Washington’s Birthday” in section 6103(a) of title 5 of the United States Code, which is the law that specifies holidays for Federal employees. Though other institutions such as state and local governments and private businesses may use other names, it is our policy to always refer to holidays by the names designated in the law.

President Nixon is frequently identified as the party responsible for changing Washington’s Birthday into President’s Day and fostering the notion that it is a day for commemorating all U.S. Presidents, a feat he supposedly achieved by issuing a proclamation on 21 February 1971 which declared the third Monday in February to be a “holiday set aside to honor all presidents, even myself.” This claim stems not from fact, however, but from a newspaper spoof. Actually, presidential records indicate that Nixon merely issued an Executive Order (11582) on 11 February 1971 defining the third Monday of February as a holiday, and the announcement of that Executive Order identified the day as “Washington’s Birthday.”

Washington’s Birthday has become Presidents’ Day (or President’s Day, or even Presidents Day; the usage is inconsistent) for many of us because federal holidays technically apply only to persons employed by the federal government (and the District of Columbia). Individual state governments do not have to observe federal holidays — most of them generally do (and most private employers and school districts follow suit), but federal and state holiday observances can differ. For example, former Confederate states have observed several holidays not recognized at a federal level (such as June 3, Jefferson Davis Day), and controversial Arizona governor Ev Mecham drew headlines in 1987 when one of his first official acts upon inauguration was to rescind an executive order issued by the previous governor that had established the birthday of Martin Luther King, Jr. (a federal holiday) as an Arizona state holiday.

Although Lincoln’s Birthday had never been designated as a federal holiday, it was observed as a state holiday in many parts of the country. However, after additional federal holidays were created for Columbus Day and the Birthday of Martin Luther King, Jr. (in 1971 and 1986, respectively), some states dropped the observance of Lincoln’s Birthday as a separate holiday in order to maintain a fixed number of paid holidays per year (and some states had never observed Lincoln’s Birthday in the first place). As a result, we now have a hodgepodge of state holiday schedules in the USA: some states still observe Lincoln’s and Washington’s birthdays as separate holidays, some states observe only Washington’s Birthday, some states commemorate both with a single Presidents’ Day (or Lincoln-Washington Day), and some states celebrate neither. And there are odd exceptions such as Alabama, which designated the third Monday in February as a day commemorating both George Washington and Thomas Jefferson (even though Jefferson was born in April). A few states even moved their observances of Washington’s Birthday, Lincoln’s Birthday, and Presidents’ Day to November or December in order to lengthen the Thanksgiving and Christmas holiday periods without creating additional paid holidays.

An attempt to clear up some of this confusion at the federal level was made through the introduction of the ‘Washington-Lincoln Recognition Act of 2001’ (HR 420) to Congress in 2001. The bill proposed that “the legal public holiday known as Washington’s Birthday shall be referred to by that name and no other by all entities and officials of the United States Government” and requested “that the President issue a proclamation each year recognizing the anniversary of the birth of President Abraham Lincoln and calling upon the people of the United States to observe such anniversary with appropriate ceremonies and activities,” but it failed to clear subcommittee and languished there without ever being voted upon.

Confused, Yet?
(Wait.  There's more)

Well, if that's not confusing enough, look at the "officially" listed Flag Days.  They include (1) Lincoln's Birthday (February 12th), (2) Presidents' Day (3rd Monday in February) and (3) Washington's Brithday (February 22nd).  I guess that's to cover all the bases.  However, we tend to fly our flags on the third Monday but it's okay to fly old glory on all three days (or even every day of the year).  That being said, I count 25 Flag Flying days (assuming Inauguration Day (January 20th) and Presidential Election Day (1st Tuesday after 1st Monday in November) only happen once every four years.)   Strangely enough, I see an Army Day (April 6th), a Coast Guard Day (August 4th) and a Navy Day (October 27th) but I don't see a day celebrating (a) the Marines birthday (November 10th, 1775), nor (b) the Air Force birthday (September 18, 1947).  

Then I see we still celebrate both a V-E Day (May 8th) - 73 years ago, a V-J Day (September 3rd) - 73 years ago, and a Pearl Harbor Remembrance Day (December 7th) - 77 years ago, each reflecting our WW-II days.  Yet, the Japanese and the Germans are now two of our closest allies.  Maybe, just maybe, it's time to stop the flag waving on those days.

And (for now), we still celebrate Columbus Day (2nd Monday in October).




There are nearly 1,500 national days. Don’t miss a single one.

February
18

Sunday
February
19

Monday
February
20

Tuesday
February
21
 
Wednesday
February
22

Thursday
February
23

Friday
February
24

Saturday

National
Battery
Day


National
Chocolate
Mint

Day


National
Cherry
Pie
Day


National
Stickie
Bun
Day


** National
California
Day **


National
Skip The
Straw
Day


National
Tortilla
Chip
Day


National
Crab
Stuffed
Flounder
Day


National
Lash
Day


National
Love
Your
Pet
Day


National
Cook A
Sweet
Potato
Day


National
Tile
Day


National
Drink
Wine
Day


President's
Day


National
Margarita
Day


National
Banana
Bread
Day


It's a Flag Day!!!


National
Chili
Day


National
Dog
Bisquit
Day




National
Toast
Day

** Not necessarily declared a National Day but has been proclaimed a special day. **



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Articles, jokes, photos, etc. from you, our massive hive of reporters, always helps!
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This Weeks Chronicle and Older Copies

2017-07-09 2017-09-17 2017-11-26 2018-02-04
2017-07-16 2017-09-24 2017-12-03 2018-02-11
2017-07-23 2017-10-01 2017-12-10 2018-02-18
2017-07-30 2017-10-08 2017-12-17 2018-02-25
2017-08-06 2017-10-15 2017-12-24 2018-03-04
2017-08-13 2017-10-22 2017-12-31 2018-03-11
2017-08-20 2017-10-29 2018-01-07 2018-03-18
2017-08-27 2017-11-05 2018-01-14 2018-03-25
2017-09-03 2017-11-12 2018-01-21 2018-04-01
2017-09-10 2017-11-19 2018-01-28 2018-04-08
    AED NEWS: 


WCBM AED PROGRAM


Learn CPR


March 14, 2018 AED Coordinator's

Meeting Agenda/Minutes


How To
Use An
AED


September 2017 AED Coordinator's Meeting Minutes (None)


What Happens
When I Call 911


March 2017 AED Coordinator's Meeting Minutes (From Larry Scovotto ReadyAlert with WAPO Coordinators comments/additions)


How To
Save a Life


October 2016 AED Coordinator's Meeting Minutes (From Larry
Scovotto ReadyAlert)


October 2016 AED
Coordinator's Meeting Presentation Slides


Cardiac
Science




Latrobe Villas
AED Program


WAPO
Quick Start


ASHI Student
Handbook


Neighborhood
Responder
Schedule


ASHI CPR VIDEO

























1.     The WAPO AED group has two CPR Anytime kits that are intended to allow people to train themselves in hands-only CPR.  The time required to train yourself is about 30 minutes. 

2.     Each WAPO responder is trained in CPR as well as the usage of an AED. However, the first person on the scene is normally a spouse or other member of the household.  Thus, it is best for everyone to be trained in CPR.  Contact one of our facilitators to learn more:

a.     LarryEamigh   

     (352) 753- 7449  larry@eamigh.com

b.     Ross Irlam        

     (352) 561-4003  rossirlam@gmail.com

c.      JerryTumbush - 

     (352) 430-1657  jtumbush@hotmail.com

3. They will coordinate the availability of a CPR Anytime kit with Mini-Anne  for you to check out and learn CPR.


Here's how to use the Mini-Anne you just checked out:

      1.     Play the DVD inside the CPR Anytime Kit.  The DVD includes instructions for inflating the mannequin.  There are sanitizers in the kit if you wish to sanitize the mannequin before inflating it.  There is a clicker in the mannequin that clicks when you have depressed the chest of the mannequin sufficiently.  Some people will have trouble making the clicker click.  Do your best and remember what is said on the DVD, “Any CPR is better than no CPR.”

a.     When the DVD initializes, select English.

b.    Select “Learn Adult Hands-Only” CPR and follow the verbal instructions.

c.     If you wish to practice, select “Practice Hands-Only CPR” on the DVD.

     2.     There are other lifesaving related topics on the DVD that are available to watch.

      3.     Please return the CPR anytime kit when you are finished with it to Larry and thanks for learning CPR.


Other Stuff you may be interested in:


NICE TO KNOW STUFF

Maneuvering Sumter County Roundabouts

(Note the highlighted sections)

Gardening

Provided by: Chris Moyer

(this contains a .pdf file)

Questions?  Call Chris Moyer

(352) 633-3627

Shovelin’ Sunshine (Music)

VILLAGE SPEED LIMITS

WPBM Checklist

Friendship Cards

(how page 7 used to look - and operate)

Restaurant Inspections In The Villages

 Interesting Links to Web Sites:


  The Bulletin  
  Champions of Residents' Rights Since 1975  
The POA Website


Red Skelton’s Pledge of Allegiance
 

Foster Brooks Roasts Jackie Gleason


VirginiaTrace Social Club Web Page

GAMES

(New Games shown in RED)

So why link to sites that are NEVER available?  Good question. Let's start a quest to find sites that are more amenable. (Of course, you may have to click around to find the right game but.......and then there's the advertisements you have to suffer through.... but all-in-all it does get you to some games to sooth your mind.)

NOTE:  You may be using up any data time you signed up for unless you have an unlimited plan....

For the most part, I have avoided any site that wants you to "sign up" or give them information (that can only be used to try to sell you something or is needed to put you on a list that others obtain). Avoid these type of sites at all costs.  The hassle just isn't worth it.....

JEWEL GAMES
Ancient Jewels Bejeweled3
SHOOTING GAMES
Target Zone Hunting Season
CASINO GAMES
ADVENTURE GAMES

Achievement
Unlocked 3


CARD GAMES
DRIVING GAMES
ESCAPE GAMES
Fleeing The Complex
Cube Escape - Arles
TOWER DEFENSE

Cursed Treasure
(Level Pack)

Kingdom Rush Kingdom Rush
Frontiers



The table below is a list of the activities your neighbors are interested in.   One or more volunteers from each list are needed to run that activity starting off by contacting the others on that list.  Please keep the Chronicle informed of the activities and who is running each one by e-mailing editor@witherspoonpath.com. If you'd like to be added to one or more lists, just send an e-mail to editor@witherspoonpath.com and ask to be added.
  
[Updated April 2014]
 
Ballroom Dancing
Report
Charity Work
Report
Hula Report
Shopping Report
Basketball Games
Report
Computer Report
Jacksonville
Trip
Report
ShuffleBoard Report
BBQ Report Couples Luncheon
Report
Ladies Luncheon
Report
Launch from
the Cape
Report
Bicycle Report Cribbage Report Line Dancing Report Singing Report
Billards Report Cruises Report MLB Game
Report
Socials Report
Bingo Report Daytona
Beach Trip

Report
Motorcycles Report Street Party Report
Bocce Ball
Report
Disney World
Report
Musical Instruments
Report
Swimming Report
Book Club Report Exercise Report Photography Report Two-Step Report
Bowling Report Fishing Report Pickleball Report Universal Report
Bridge Report Florida Keys
Weekend
Report
Poker Report VolleyBall Report
Canasta Report Genealogy Report Pottery Report Walking Report
Cards Report Gin Rummy Report Pro-Football Game
Report

Thanks for dropping by.  It does get lonely
down here at the
bottom of Page 0.



Cars Report Golf Report Scavenger Hunt
Report
Casino Report Horseshoes Report Sea World Report



February 11, 2018

Yankee Doodle Dandy is a 1942 American biographical musical film about George M. Cohan, known as "The Man Who Owned Broadway". It stars James Cagney, Joan Leslie, Walter Huston, and Richard Whorf, and features Irene Manning, George Tobias, Rosemary DeCamp, Jeanne Cagney, and Vera Lewis. Joan Leslie's singing voice was partially dubbed by Sally Sweetland.

The film was written by Robert Buckner and Edmund Joseph, and directed by Michael Curtiz. According to the special edition DVD, significant and uncredited improvements were made to the script by the famous "script doctors", twin brothers Julius J. Epstein and Philip G. Epstein.

In 1993, Yankee Doodle Dandy was selected for preservation in the United States National Film Registry by the Library of Congress as being "culturally, historically, or aesthetically significant".



"You're a Grand Old Flag" - Performed by James Cagney and Chorus.


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